Top Ten: GN I’ve Added to My TBR

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted at That Artsy Reader Girl. This week’s theme was the last ten books I added to my TBR, but since I cover new TBR additions in my monthly wrap-up posts, I decided to focus on the last ten GN I added to my TBR!

Bloom by Kevin Panetta // Everyone’s a Aliebn When Ur a Aliebn Too by Jonny Sun // Fight Club 2 by Chuck Palahniuk // March: Book One by John Lewis // The One Hundred Nights of Hero by Isabel Greenberg

Patience by Daniel Clowes // Shigeru Mizuki’s Hitler by Shigeru Mizuki // Someone Please Have Sex with Me by Gina Wynbrandt // We Stand on Guard by Brian K. Vaughn // The White Donkey: Terminal Lance by Maximilian Uriarte

Buy Borrow Bypass: On Grief

Book Riot does this great feature called “Buy, Borrow, Bypass” and I like it, so I’m going to do that here.

AMothersReckoningA Mother’s Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy by Sue Klebold

Sue Klebold is best known as the mother of Columbine shooter Dylan Klebold – and she knows it. Although her memoir twists around April 20th, 1999 (both the Before and the After), it’s not really about Columbine or even Dylan. Instead, A Mother’s Reckoning is an open-ended exploration into all of the small and large decisions she made as Dylan’s parent and also all the ramifications of those decisions – both in 1999 and 2016. Each memory has the benefit of hindsight, but also Klebold’s many years working to prevent suicide and murder-suicides. I enjoyed the biographical sections and self-reflections more than the psychology and push for mental health awareness, and readers looking for a biography of either Dylan or Columbine should best look elsewhere.

Verdict: BORROW

RosalieLightning

Rosalie Lightning by Tom Hart

Honestly, I thought Rosalie Lightning was just okay. I wanted to like it, to come out of the  100ish pages that comprise Tom Hart’s graphic memoir after the death of his daughter Rosalie with some kind of reaction other than ¯\_(ツ)_/¯. Unfortunately, grief is too messy for that. It’s too abstract and it takes too many forms to be universally understood in any one medium. And perhaps I was looking at Rosalie Lightning as the tribute that it could have been, the celebration of a child’s brief life in color and abstract form. Instead, Hart uses drawing to climb out of the hole she left behind. And, in experiencing that grief with him, I felt that maybe I wasn’t supposed to be a part of the process at all.

Verdict: BYPASS

WhenBreathBecomesAirWhen Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

This posthumous memoir is a gut puncher. You know that its author, Paul Kalanithi, ultimately died at thirty-six from metastasized stage IV lung cancer before you start reading. It’s there: in the small blurb on the back cover, in Kalanithi’s author bio, in Abraham Verghese’s forward, in every piece of publicity the book acquired since it was published in January. Kalanithi’s death permeates the text, hanging over our reading experience as it must have for Kalanithi himself. Except that, I don’t think he would want us to dwell. For Kalanithi, death was just another facet of life – a question to be answered, yes, but not something to be feared or avoided. He explains for us (and possibly his daughter) how and why he became a doctor, and it is in that meditative reflection in exacting prose that we are forced to confront our own fears and anxieties about death and the unlived life. Just reading his memoir makes me hope that I can accomplish in my lifetime what Kalanithi did in his.

Verdict: BUY

Goodreads Review: Lumberjanes, Vol. 3: A Terrible Plan

LumberjanesV3Title: Lumberjanes, Vol. 3: A Terrible Plan
Author: Noelle Stevenson and Shannon Watters
Rating: ★★
Summary: Trying to take advantage of the first quiet day at camp in a while, Mal and Molly’s date takes a bizarre turn with the appearance of the Bear Woman! Back at camp, Jo, April, and Ripley must stay on their toes as they try and earn every badge possible, which ends up being a lot harder than any of them planned.


Noelle Stevenson deftly continues her summer camp saga Lumberjanes, but this third volume doesn’t feel as action-packed as Beware the Kitten Holy or Friendship to the Max – perhaps because our fearless five-some is split up for three of the four issues and, when they are together, we just get to read their attempts at scary ghost stories. Plus, the lack of Brooke Allen’s illustrations is noticeable enough to affect the story. Ultimately, A Terrible Plan just feels like a terrible Lumberjanes installment.

Top Ten: Graphic Novels & Comics on My TBR List

logo-TopTenTuesdayTop Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted at The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s theme was ¯\_(ツ)_/¯. (JK, it was a freebie!)

I had originally planned to make a Five Favorite post about graphic novels… then realized I had read more comics than graphic novels… then thought I should do a FF on TBR graphic novels… and then had so many that I didn’t want to limit myself to just five! So, in no particular order, here are ten graphic novels and comics I am itching to read (hopefully in 2016!).

ttt_GraphicNovelsTBR1

Batman: The Dark Knight Returns by Frank Miller

Bitch Planet, vol. 1: Extraordinary Machine by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Valentine De Landro

Captain America: Winter Soldier, vol. 1 by Ed Brubaker

Filmish: A Graphic Journey Through Film by Edward Ross

Giant Days, vol. 1 by John Allison

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Lady Killer by Joëlle Jones and Jamie S. Rich

Nimona by Noelle Stevenson

Rat Queens, vol. 1: Sass & Sorcery by Kurtis J. Wiebe

Soppy: A Love Story by Philippa Rice

Trashed by Derf Backderf