Top Ten: Authors I Read for the First Time in 2015

logo-TopTenTuesdayTop Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted at The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s theme was authors I read for the first time in 2015.

Some of these authors had been on my radar before the start of the year, and then some of them popped up along with whatever book I ultimately read! (I included the titles that got me hooked as well.)

  1. Amy Poehler (Yes Please)
  2. Andy Weir (The Martian)
  3. Aziz Ansari (Modern Romance)
  4. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (We Should All Be Feminists)
  5. Emily St. John Mandel (Station Eleven)
  6. G. Willow Wilson (Ms. Marvel, Vol. 1: No Normal; Vol. 2: Generation Why; Vol. 3: Crushed; and Vol. 4: Last Days)
  7. Heather Cocks & Jessica Morgan (The Royal We)
  8. Mindy Kaling (Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns) and Why Not Me?)
  9. Noelle Stevenson (Lumberjanes, Vol. 1: Beware the Kitten Holy and Vol. 2: Friendship to the Max)
  10. Roxane Gay (Bad Feminist)

Five Favorite: Memoirs by Women

“Five Favorite” is a feature on thewasofshall where I lay out my five favorite “x”. Sometimes they’re relevant to a season or holiday, mostly they’re not. It’s an all-around fun excuse to give my 100% amazingly awesome opinion. To see previous (and future) topics, click here. To participate, scroll all the way down.

For Women’s History Month, I’ve been spotlighting books by or about women. For this last week, I want to focus on memoirs written by females because, well, why the hell not? Whether they’re laugh-out-loud funny, honest, heartbreaking, so something totally different, here are my five favorite.

BitterIsTheNewBlackBitter Is the New Black: Confessions of a Condescending, Egomaniacal, Self-Centered Smartass, Or, Why You Should Never Carry a Prada Bag to the Unemployment Office by Jen Lancaster

NotThatKindOfGirlNot That Kind of Girl: A Young Woman Tells You What She’s “Learned” by Lena Dunham

Persepolis
Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood
by Marjane Satrapi

WhatIWasDoingWhileYouWereBreedingWhat I Was Doing While You Were Breeding by Kristin Newman

YesPleaseYes Please by Amy Poehler

Have your own five favorite memoirs by women? Share them! Post them to your blog, link back to this post, and then comment letting me know!

Review: Yes Please by Amy Poehler

YesPleaseTitle: Yes Please
Author: Amy Poehler
Rating: ★★★★
Summary: A collection of stories, thoughts, ideas, lists, and haiku from the mind of one of our most beloved entertainers, Yes Please offers Amy Poehler’s thoughts on everything from her “too safe” childhood outside of Boston to her early days in New York City, her ideas about Hollywood and “the biz,” the demon that looks back at all of us in the mirror, and her joy at being told she has a “face for wigs.” Yes Please is a chock-full of words and wisdom to live by.


Amy Poehler is a funny lady (and if you don’t think so, maybe this blog isn’t for you). She’s smart and talented and unafraid to speak her mind or stand up for herself. And, boy, I did not know that I admired her until I started reading this book.

I mean, I think that it’s tough for anyone to write an interesting memoir, let alone someone who’s not only known for being funny, but also predominantly associated with sketch comedy, a medium which encourages the performer to use more than just his or her voice. So, Poehler isn’t just funny because of what she says, she’s funny because of the way she says it, or how her body moves while she says it, or the look she gives just after she finishes saying it. And that kind of humor is so totally hard to get across in print. (So, yeah, I’m a fan.)

Although Yes Please is technically a memoir, it doesn’t really feel like one. Poehler weaves past experiences into her most recent accomplishments, telling a thematic story instead of a linear one – interpreting her life instead of just regurgitating it. Her book is divided into loose essay-ish narratives punctuated by huge two-page quotes and hilarious photos while her writing is thoughtful, and brash, and foul, and frank, and, yes, funny. I want to be Poehler’s best friend and laugh at all her crude jokes. I want to let her know that she inspires me to be bolder, more honest, and, most importantly, less critical (of both myself and of others). She gives me courage to say the truth, even when that means admitting that I’ve fucked up. Her memoir isn’t just her story so far – it’s everything she’s learned while living that story, a story I really hope means another book will pop up someday down the road, complete with even funnier pictures and even dirtier humor.

In short, remember the titular directive: be polite and ask for what you want. (Yes please indeed.)