Top Ten: Longest Books I’ve Read

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted at That Artsy Reader Girl. This week’s theme was the longest books I’ve read. To keep from padding the list, I only included the longest book in any one series. The number of pages is included in parentheses.

Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand (1,069) // City on Fire by Garth Risk Hallberg (911) // A Dance with Dragons by George R.R. Martin (1,016) // Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling // I Know This Much Is True by Wally Lamb (897)

Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke (849) The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien (1,187) // The Passage by Justin Cronin (879) // The Sweet Far Thing by Libba Bray (819) // 2666 by Roberto Bolaño (898)

Top Ten: Books Set Outside the US

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted at The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s theme was a rewind, so I chose to cover July 19th’s list: top ten books set outside the US. Although I mostly read books set in England, I was able to find ten books set wholly (or partly) in ten different countries (and also another planet).

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(Czech Republic) The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay by Michael Chabon // (England) A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness // (France) A Very Long Engagement by Sébastien Japrisot // (Germany) The Book Thief by Markus Zusak // (India) The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie

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(Iran) Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi // (Italy) Catch-22 by Joseph Heller // (Mexico) 2666 by Roberto Bolaño // (Turkey) Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides // (Mars) The Martian by Andy Weir

Five Favorite: Quotes

“Five Favorite” is a feature on thewasofshall where I lay out my five favorite “x”. Sometimes they’re relevant to a season or holiday, mostly they’re not. It’s an all-around fun excuse to give my 100% amazingly awesome opinion. To see previous topics, click here.

Quotes are tricky. What makes a reader dog-ear a page to come back to? Underline a string of words? Write them down? Memorize them? Half of the things I think I want to savor, I end up re-reading and then deciding they aren’t worth the effort it would take to save. But the five below, those are some of my favorite.

I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look, or the words, which laid the foundation.  It is too long ago.  I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.


Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

I watched her for a long time, memorizing her shoulders, her long-legged gait.  This was how girls left.  They packed up their suitcases and walked away in high heels.  They pretended they weren’t crying, that it wasn’t the worst day of their lives.  That they didn’t want their mothers to come running after them, begging their forgiveness, that they wouldn’t have gone down on their knees and thanked God if they could stay.


White Oleander by Janet Fitch

Sara waited a respectful time, knowing there was nothing she could do to ease the woman’s pain. Grief was a place, Sara understood, where a person went alone. It was like a room without doors, and what happened in that room, all the anger and the pain you felt, was meant to stay there, nobody’s business but yours.


The Passage by Justin Cronin

“Tell me, then,” she said, unbuckling her seat belt and putting her arm around his waist. “Tell me now, won’t you ever wonder what it would have been like to be with someone else?”
“It would be less,” he said.
“Less?”
He looked over at her, just for a second, sitting sideways in her bucket seat, and squeezed the steering wheel. “It would have to be. I already love you so much. I already feel like something in my chest is going to pop when I see you. I couldn’t love anyone more than I do you, it would kill me. And I couldn’t love anyone less because it would always feel like less. Even if I loved some other girl, that’s all I would ever think about, the difference between loving her and loving you.”


Attachments by Rainbow Rowell

When they turned, Pelletier and Espinoza saw an older woman in a white blouse and black skirt, a woman with a figure like Marlene Dietrich, as Pelletier would say much later, a woman who despite her years was still as strong willed as ever, a woman who didn’t cling to the edge of the abyss but plunged into it with curiosity and elegance.  A woman who plunged into the abyss sitting down.


2666 by Roberto Bolaño

Have your own five favorite quotes? Let me know!

Five Favorite: Novels with Multiple POVs

“Five Favorite” is a feature on thewasofshall where I lay out my five favorite “x”. Sometimes they’re relevant to a season or holiday, mostly they’re not. It’s an all-around fun excuse to give my 100% amazingly awesome opinion. To see previous (and future) topics, click here. To participate, scroll all the way down.

Done right, novels with a plethora of main characters featuring a multitude of voices are my absolute favorites. Here are my top five!

2666

2666 by Roberto Bolaño

Blackout

Blackout by Connie Willis

BrokenMonsters

Broken Monsters by Lauren Beukes

GoneGirl

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

StationEleven

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

Have your own five favorite multi-POV novels? Share them! Post them to your blog, link back to this post, and then comment letting me know!

Top Ten: Books That Celebrate Diverse Characters

logo-TopTenTuesdayTop Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted at The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s theme was books that celebrate diversity/diverse characters.

I’m not sure that these ten books really “celebrate” diversity as much as they predominately feature non-white characters/poc without making a huge deal about said non-whiteness. Whether in the US or abroad, here are ten novels that at least let readers peak into what it’s like to not be the default standard for protagonists.

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House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III

For the Win by Cory Doctorow

2666 by Roberto Bolaño

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey

Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satrapi

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Little Bee by Chris Cleave

The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace: A Brilliant Young Man Who Left Newark for the Ivy League by Jeff Hobbs

The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie

We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed with Our Families by Philip Gourevitch

The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz