The Hold Shelf #1

Very rarely do I place library holds on new releases – either because I can’t predict when a book will find its way to me (when I’m in the middle of something else??) or because there just isn’t anything I absolutely have to read right away. And then there are these titles:

The City of Mirrors by Justin Cronin: all I can say right now is some variation of this and this. Not only am I planning on reading The City of Mirrors right away, I’m about 110% sure that I am going to pre-order the hardcover copy because I AM SO READY FOR THIS BOOK.

A Gathering of Shadows by V.E. Schwab: after (basically) speed-reading through A Darker Shade of Magic, I knew I wouldn’t be able to wait very long for its sequel.

Hamilton: The Revolution by Lin-Manuel Miranda and Jeffrey Seller: I am obsessed with this musical (and its soundtrack), okay. OBSESSED. I want need this in my grubby hands asap because reasons. (Also Lin is my queen.)

Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body by Roxane Gay: after reading (and loving) Bad Feminist, anything Gay writes is pretty much going to be a “stop what you’re doing and read this right now” kind of deal – especially if its nonfiction.

A Mother’s Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy by Sue Klebold: not all school shootings get their own biographies (a la Columbine by Dave Cullen), and not all school shooters are revisited decades later, but, for better or worse, the tragedy at Columbine stands out. Cullen’s book is already on my tbr list, but reading A Mother’s Reckoning might push it up to the top.

Rosalie Lightning: A Graphic Memoir by Tom Hart: this book will probably make me cry (I’m sort of expecting it to), but, from what I’ve heard, it’s going to be amazing (in that heartbreaking sad kind of way).

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi: I rarely get seized by literary FOMO – either something that “pops” sounds interesting and I put it on my tbr list to be revisited when the hype dies down (and library copies become available) or I do a little research and am, like, “eh, not for me” – but Kalanithi’s posthumous memoir is something I’m willing to wait months to read.